Fukushima Daiichi TEPCO Nuclear Power Plant Accident: Comprehensive Coverage of Every Aspect of the Worst Nuclear Crisis Since Chernobyl (DVD-ROM)

This comprehensive DVD-ROM provides complete coverage of the crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the world’s worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl. Every aspect of the accident from the moment it began on March 11, 2011 following the Great East Japan Earthquake is fully chronicled. This magnitude 9.0 earthquake and the subsequent tsunami caused significant damage to four of the six units of Fukushima Daiichi, operated by the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), as the result of a sustained loss of both the offsite and on-site power systems. Efforts to restore power to emergency equipment have been hampered or impeded by damage to the surrounding areas due to the tsunami and earthquake. As the fuel rods became partially uncovered, hydrogen gas built up inside the reactor buildings and caused devastating explosions. Radiation was released, and widespread evacuations were ordered. This thorough compilation of official information and documents includes material from International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. government agencies, and official sources in Japan – providing an authoritative running narrative of the event as it happened hour by hour, plus important and little-known background data. TEPCO’s latest roadmap for achieving a cool shutdown of the damaged reactors and dealing with the accident is covered. Contents of the chronicle: Chapter 1: Roadmap towards Restoration from the Accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station; Chapter 2: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Statements on the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Through mid-April; Chapter 3: Japan Government Statements and Notices About the Fukushima Nuclear Crisis – including News Briefings by Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA), Chief Cabinet Secretary Edano, and Prime Minister Kan; Chapter 4: CRS Report for Congress – Fukushima Nuclear Crisis; Chapter 5: Nuclear Regulatory Commission Material; Chapter 6: American Government Agencies; Chapter 7: Energy Department Material; Chapter 8: Testimony before the U.S. Senate; Chapter 9: Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Press Releases Regarding the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station after the Niigata-Chuetsu-Oki Earthquake (2007 Incident and Response). Expert testimony before the U.S. Senate and material from the NRC discusses the safety of U.S. nuclear facilities in light of the Fukushima accident; there is extensive discussion of the earthquake risk at California power plants, emergency planning for loss of coolant accidents, and preparations for public health impacts. Information from the EPA and FDA deals with the effects of radiation from Fukushima on the environment and food supply of the United States. A unique chapter provides the running account of TEPCO’s problems and radiation leaks from the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station in Niigata Prefecture following a strong earthquake in 2007.This exceptional collection includes over 17,000 pages reproduced in Adobe Acrobat PDF files, plus three audio/video files in mp3, mp4, and mpg formats. In addition to the comprehensive coverage of the Fukushima accident, there is material about nuclear accidents, radiation, radiological emergencies, nuclear terrorism, medical management, and more. There is material from the military, FEMA, DOE, EPA and other federal agencies. This material is drawn from our 2010 Ultimate Professional Guide to Nuclear Weapons, Radiation, Radiological Emergencies (Two DVD-ROM Set).

The decade of despair. (how the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant meltdown has affected Russian life)(Cover Story): An article from: Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

This digital document is an article from Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, published by Educational Foundation for Nuclear Science, Inc. on May 1, 1996. The length of the article is 6335 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

From the supplier: The Apr 1986 nuclear power plant disaster at Chernobyl in the Soviet Union has lingering effects ten years later. One death toll estimate is 125,000 and many people still suffer health problems. Republic governments have done little to help and have not changed their energy policy about nuclear power.

Citation Details
Title: The decade of despair. (how the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant meltdown has affected Russian life)(Cover Story)
Author: David R. Marples
Publication: Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Refereed)
Date: May 1, 1996
Publisher: Educational Foundation for Nuclear Science, Inc.
Volume: v52 Issue: n3 Page: p22(10)

Article Type: Cover Story

Distributed by Thomson Gale

Memories of a Meltdown: An Egyptian Between Moscow and Chernobyl (Modern Arabic Literature)

In the spring of 1986, Mohamed Makhzangi, an Egyptian doctor, was studying in Kiev. As a result, like thousands of others he found himself living a nuclear nightmare when the Chernobyl plant had a catastrophic meltdown.

Blending the realism of journalism with the emotional resonance of fiction, Makhzangi conveys the quiet but steadily mounting atmosphere of fear and panic, the dubious reliability of official statements, and an overall loss of the sense of safety, of anything ever being right with the world again. From the balding colleague who is concerned only about whether his hair will fall out, to the grandfather who believes there is less contamination in hot tap water than cold, Makhzangi portrays people unwilling or unable to believe in the magnitude of the disaster unfolding around them.

In the finest tradition of literary reportage, Makhzangi masterfully conveys the loneliness of exile, the urgency of a great tragedy, and the intimacy of personal experience.

Wormwood Forest: A Natural History of Chernobyl

When a titanic explosion ripped through the Number Four reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant in 1986, spewing flames and chunks of burning, radioactive material into the atmosphere, one of our worst nightmares came true. As the news gradually seeped out of the USSR and the extent of the disaster was realized, it became clear how horribly wrong things had gone. Dozens died – two from the explosion and many more from radiation illness during the following months – while scores of additional victims came down with acute radiation sickness. Hundreds of thousands were evacuated from the most contaminated areas. The prognosis for Chernobyl and its environs – succinctly dubbed the Zone of Alienation – was grim. Today, 20 years after the worst nuclear power plant accident in history, intrepid journalist Mary Mycio dons dosimeter and camouflage protective gear to explore the world’s most infamous radioactive wilderness. As she tours the Zone to report on the disaster’s long-term effects on its human, faunal, and floral inhabitants, she meets pockets of defiant local residents who have remained behind to survive and make a life in the Zone. And she is shocked to discover that the area surrounding Chernobyl has become Europe’s largest wildlife sanctuary, a flourishing – at times unearthly – wilderness teeming with large animals and a variety of birds, many of them members of rare and endangered species. Like the forests, fields, and swamps of their unexpectedly inviting habitat, both the people and the animals are all radioactive. Cesium-137 is packed in their muscles and strontium-90 in their bones. But quite astonishingly, they are also thriving. If fears of the Apocalypse and a lifeless, barren radioactive future have been constant companions of the nuclear age, Chernobyl now shows us a different view of the future. A vivid blend of reportage, popular science, and illuminating encounters that explode the myths of Chernobyl with facts that are at once beautiful and horrible, “Wormwood Forest” brings a remarkable land – and its people and animals – to life to tell a unique story of science, surprise and suspense.

The Legacy of Chernobyl

“A damning history of the Chernobyl affair, from its origins in the plant’s primitive design and careless management to the economic and political crisis the accident precipitated.” —Clenn Garelik, New York Times Book Review

On the morning of April 26, 1986, a Soviet nuclear plant at Chernobyl (near Kiev) exploded, pouring radioactivity into the environment and setting off the worst disaster in the history of nuclear energy. Now a former Soviet scientist gives a comprehensive account of the catastrophe.

Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster


Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award

On April 26, 1986, the worst nuclear reactor accident in history occurred in Chernobyl and contaminated as much as three quarters of Europe. Voices from Chernobyl is the first book to present personal accounts of the tragedy. Journalist Svetlana Alexievich interviewed hundreds of people affected by the meltdown—from innocent citizens to firefighters to those called in to clean up the disaster—and their stories reveal the fear, anger, and uncertainty with which they still live. Comprised of interviews in monologue form, Voices from Chernobyl is a crucially important work, unforgettable in its emotional power and honesty.

Chernobyl Ten Years On, Radiological and Health Impact. An Appraisal (UKRAINE RADIATION REPORT)

Normal Accidents analyzes the social side of technological risk. Charles Perrow argues that the conventional engineering approach to ensuring safety–building in more warnings and safeguards–fails because systems complexity makes failures inevitable. He asserts that typical precautions, by adding to complexity, may help create new categories of accidents. (At Chernobyl, tests of a new safety system helped produce the meltdown and subsequent fire.) By recognizing two dimensions of risk–complex versus linear interactions, and tight versus loose coupling–this book provides a powerful framework for analyzing risks and the organizations that insist we run them.

The first edition fulfilled one reviewer’s prediction that it “may mark the beginning of accident research.” In the new afterword to this edition Perrow reviews the extensive work on the major accidents of the last fifteen years, including Bhopal, Chernobyl, and the Challenger disaster. The new postscript probes what the author considers to be the “quintessential ‘Normal Accident'” of our time: the Y2K computer problem.

One reason why Fukushima is not Chernobyl: seafood.(GUEST COLUMN): An article from: Canadian Chemical News

The three major nuclear power plant accidents – Fukushima Daiichi in 2011, Three Mile Island in 1979, and Chernobyl in 1986 – are fully covered in this authoritative collection of official reports, with over 1,300 pages.

Fukushima Accident: This thorough compilation of official information and documents includes material from International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. government agencies, and official sources in Japan – providing an authoritative running narrative of the event as it happened hour by hour, plus important and little-known background data. TEPCO’s latest roadmap for achieving a cool shutdown of the damaged reactors and dealing with the accident is covered. Expert testimony before the U.S. Senate and material from the NRC discusses the safety of U.S. nuclear facilities in light of the Fukushima accident; there is extensive discussion of the earthquake risk at California power plants, emergency planning for loss of coolant accidents, and preparations for public health impacts. Information from the EPA and FDA deals with the effects of radiation from Fukushima on the environment and food supply of the United States. A unique chapter provides the running account of TEPCO’s problems and radiation leaks from the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station in Niigata Prefecture following a strong earthquake in 2007.

Contents: Chapter 1: Roadmap towards Restoration from the Accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station; Chapter 2: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Statements on the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Through mid-April; Chapter 3: Japan Government Statements and Notices About the Fukushima Nuclear Crisis – including News Briefings by Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA), Chief Cabinet Secretary Edano, and Prime Minister Kan; Chapter 4: CRS Report for Congress – Fukushima Nuclear Crisis; Chapter 5: Nuclear Regulatory Commission Material; Chapter 6: American Government Agencies; Chapter 7: Energy Department Material; Chapter 8: Testimony before the U.S. Senate; Chapter 9: Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Press Releases Regarding the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station after the Niigata-Chuetsu-Oki Earthquake (2007 Incident and Response).

TMI: The 1979 nuclear meltdown accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) plant in Pennsylvania is fully covered in this authoritative collection of official documents with details about the accident and its aftermath, including the immediate and long-term health effects, a full reproduction of the report of the President’s Commission on the Accident at TMI, detailed timelines of the accident with technical information on the accident, fuel core meltdown, the evacuations, political reactions, media reports, and public consequences, and much more. Although the TMI-2 plant suffered a severe core meltdown, the most dangerous kind of nuclear power accident, it did not produce the worst-case consequences that reactor experts had long feared. In a worst-case accident, the melting of nuclear fuel would lead to a breach of the walls of the containment building and release massive quantities of radiation to the environment. But this did not occur as a result of the three Mile Island accident.

Chernobyl: The 1986 radiation accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Power Station in the Ukraine is fully covered in this authoritative collection of official documents with details about the accident and its aftermath, including the immediate and long-term health consequences, the release of radioactive cesium and iodine, thyroid cancer cases, the containment of the destroyed Unit 4 reactor, American reaction and response, and much more.

This is a privately authored news service and educational publication of Progressive Management.

Memories of a Meltdown: An Egptian Between Moscow And Chernobyl (Modern Arabic Writing)

In the spring of 1986, Mohamed Makhzangi was living in Kiev, an Egyptian doctor studying in the Ukraine. As a result, he–like thousands of other–found himself living a nuclear nightmare when the Chernobyl plant had a catastrophic meltdown. Despite numerous failsafe protections, human error sent massive quantities of deadly radiation into the serene spring of the Soviet sky. In superbly crafted prose, Memories of a Meltdown describes the days that followed from Makhzangi?s dual perspective, as both an outsider and a victim. Described by the author as an “anti-memoir”, this assemblage of impressions in the aftermath of the mltdown offers a searing account of factual events distilled through the filter of literature. Blending the realism of journalism with the emotional resonance of fiction, Makhzangi conveys the quiet but steadily mounting atmosphere of fear and panic, the dubious reliability of official statements, and an overall loss of the sense of safety, of anything ever being right with the world again. From the balding colleague who is concerned only about whether his hair will fall out, to a grandfather, fetching his young grandson a drink, who believes that there is less contamination in cool tap water than hot, Makhzangi portrays people unwilling or unable to believe in the magnitude of the disaster unfolding around them. In the finest tradition of literary reportage, Makhzangi masterfully conveys here the loneliness.

Time Magazine May 12 1986 Meltdown Chernobyl Reactor

This book explains everything about nuclear meltdowns and nuclear power plant explosions.

In the first chapter we explain how meltdowns and explosions occur. In the second chapter we discuss the details of Three Mile Island. In the third chapter we discuss the details of the infamous explosion of Chernobyl. The final chapter discusses technology and processes which can be put in place to prevent meltdowns and explosions. The Appendix has suggested guides related to the safe design and operation of nuclear power plants.

Table of Contents

A. The Science of Meltdowns and Explosions
1. Meltdowns and Explosions: Overview
2. Melting Points
3. Possible Results of a Meltdown
4. Explosion by Excessive Chain Reaction
5. Explosion by Hydrogen gas
6. Size of Potential Explosions in Nuclear Power Plant

B. Three Mile Island
1. Three Mile Island: Overview
2. Three Mile Island: Details of Events

C. Chernobyl
1. Chernobyl: Overview
2. Chernobyl: Details of Events
3. Design flaws in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant

D. Making Nuclear Power Plants Safer
1. Introduction
2. Design and Construction of Nuclear Power Plants
3. Control Room
4. Training of Operators
5. Regulations and Inspections
6. Maintenance
7. Communication and Emergency Planning
8. Defense in Depth
9. Nuclear Safety Standards

Appendix
1. American Nuclear Society Standards
2. NRC Regulation Guides